too busy to talk. (supposedly.)

One of the beautiful things about working in non-profit research is that there is a lot of down time. Most of the time I spent in the office is pretty carefree – I can write in my blog, I can read my RSS feeds, and chat with friends. This time – probably about 70% of my total hours – is time that I really enjoy my job.

Suffice it to say, I don’t really love the other 30%.

I’m not greedy, of course. I know that really liking almost three-quarters of my job puts me into a rarified loft above most Americans. In fact, I think that liking my job as much as I do really leads me to many unhealthy assumptions about the work, some noted as: a) that the work will never end abruptly, b) that I can pretty much do whatever I want whilst working as long as people are happy, and c) that I’ll be able to wear jeans everyday to work for the rest of my life. But, in the short run, there’s really nothing wrong with this viewpoint. My coworkers see me as positive, upbeat, and confident – all fine qualities to have in a team-based workplace. And these types of confident assumptions create an enviroment of comfort, therefore allowing me to be said adjectives.

But the other thirty-odd percent of the time, it’s just plain busy.

Point being: today was busy. Tomorrow will be busy. And yesterday – was busy. Busy time means no time for blogging. Or gchatting. Or watching the world’s greatest soccer fights on YouTube to kill that last long forty-five minutes before 5:30.

I suppose the world can go without hearing me for eight hours or so, three days of every ten.

Maybe.

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